Keep Simulation Projects Simple Too

We all have stories about company decisions that make us shake our head. If you have ever worked for a large organization, it may have seemed that some of their decisions were, shall we say, sub-optimal.

For example, one particular organization was using a “home grown” time reporting system that was simple, efficient, and worked well. However upper management felt the need to buy a more sophisticated “name brand” system. Unfortunately it was poorly designed and overly complicated. Rollout required extensive training and retraining to learn the simplest tasks. It was so difficult to use that many employees simply stopped using it in favor of informal arrangements with their managers (who also found it difficult to use). As a result, the company spent a lot of money and wasted a lot of employee time, and in the end they had a system that produced inferior results.

If this was an isolated case, it could be easily forgiven. But I expect most people working for large organizations could cite similar situations. Large organizations often tend to replace simplicity with complexity.

Last week in Keep Simulation Simple I talked about KIS; the Keep It Simple concept of doing just enough to do it well and no more!

I discussed how KIS could be applied to model building, but you can also extend the KIS principle to many other aspects of simulation, especially the tools you routinely use.

For time tracking, you can buy expensive highly integrated software systems like the organization above, or for desk- bound employees you can buy software that will sense or periodically ask and record what you are working on. But the cheaper, simpler and more effective solution is simply using a spreadsheet or paper form and having the employee take two minutes at the end of each day and record time against their tasks for that day. Sure there can sometimes be reason for other methods, but for the majority of us the spread sheet solution is superior.

For project management, choose the simplest tool that will meet your needs. Some projects are complex enough that they need project management software like Microsoft Project or something even better. But in many cases, such software results in a waste of time when a simple spreadsheet could meet your needs. In my experience project management software is often overkill for the types of projects we usually encounter.

In simulation software there is some inclination to buy the most comprehensive software that you can afford. But it is often better just to buy the simplest software that is likely to meet your short to intermediate-term needs. An important caution here – make sure that your software has an adequate upgrade path so that as your needs evolve you can migrate into more feature-rich software without losing your initial investment in software, training, and models.

Stay vigilant for time wasters – they often come disguised as “cool technology” and “time savers”.
Keep It Simple.

Dave Sturrock
VP Products – Simio LLC

Wood You Simulate?

I split a lot of firewood.

I get most of my firewood in 18”-48” diameter logs that must be split lengthwise to about 6” thickness.

Years ago when I first moved into a house with a fireplace, I started cutting and splitting my own wood. I used to split wood with an 8 pound maul (a maul is like a thick-bladed axe). I frequently had to supplement that with a wedge or two driven in with a large sledge hammer. Over time, I learned to “read” the grain in the wood, so that I could split along natural cracks and save myself some effort.

A few years later I bought a wood stove to supplement my heating. As my wood demands (and my muscle tone) increased I upgraded to a 14 pound maul. What a difference. Sure it was a lot more demanding to swing, but as my aim improved just about every swing resulted in the desired division of one piece of hardwood into two. Life was good.

Ten years ago I moved into the oddity of an all-electric house in the cold Northeast and shifted even more of my heating to my woodstove. After a while I started finding it hard to manually split enough wood to keep my house warm, so I bought a hydraulic splitter. Sweet! While it is still a bit difficult to manhandle a 200-300 pound log onto the splitter, once I get it there, the hydraulic ram pretty much takes care of the rest. Sometimes with badly knotted wood, I still have to “read” the wood and be a bit creative at how I direct the splitter to get through it.

Today while I was splitting some logs my mind started to wander to some parallels between splitting firewood and doing simulation projects.

Doing it yourself is definitely not for everyone. If you don’t enjoy it, and don’t have the time and skill for it, you are probably best off buying the service from someone else.

It is amazing what a difference the right tool makes. No single tool is right for everyone. For some jobs, a lightweight tool is perfect. For other jobs, nothing less than a high-end tool makes sense.

No matter what tool you use, having the good judgment to “read” the problem can make solving it a lot easier. And the more you practice, the better you will be able to determine the best approach to solving the problem.

Until next time, Happy Modeling!

Dave Sturrock
VP Products – Simio LLC

The Magic Formula for Success

Many people new to simulation rightfully inquire how they can be successful. This first article will identify some of the issues associated with simulation projects. Later articles will explore these and other issues in greater detail.

So, to get started, here are five of the more important issues that should be considered.

Project Objectives – “Model this” is not a good objective. “Prove this” is not much better. A clear objective is essential to a meaningful project. Hopefully it would include the phrases “evaluate …” and “as measured by …”.

Know Yourself – What are your strengths and weaknesses? How about those of any other team members who will be involved? Be honest. Then come up with a plan to capitalize on the strengths and overcome the weaknesses.

Domain, Tool & Process Knowledge – It is not enough to be proficient in a simulation tool. Nor is it enough to have comprehensive domain knowledge of what is being modeled. While having project participants with both of those skills is a prerequisite to success, you also need to know how to conduct a simulation project and deliver validated, valuable results.

Project Planning and Management – A project that produces results after the decision is made has little value. And an over budget project may be cancelled before completion. You must pay appropriate attention to completion dates and project costs.

Team/Reviews – Even though “No man is an island”, too often simulation projects are conducted by a single person with little or no team interaction. Find a way to get others involved.

Look for five more success factors next time. Future articles will discuss these and others in more detail.?

Dave Sturrock
VP Products – Simio LLC