The Evolution of the Industrial Ages: Industry 1.0 to 4.0

The modern industry has seen great advances since its earliest iteration at the beginning of the industrial revolution in the 18th century. For centuries, most of the goods including weapons, tools, food, clothing and housing, were manufactured by hand or by using work animals. This changed in the end of the 18th century with the introduction of manufacturing processes. The progress from Industry 1.0 was then rapid uphill climb leading up to to the upcoming industrial era – Industry 4.0. Here we discuss the overview of this evolution.

Industry 1.0 The late 18th century introduced mechanical production facilities to the world. Water and steam powered machines were developed to help workers in the mass production of goods. The first weaving loom was introduced in 1784. With the increase in production efficiency and scale, small businesses grew from serving a limited number of customers to large organizations with owners, manager and employees serving a larger number. Industry 1.0 can also be deemed as the beginning of the industry culture which focused equally on quality, efficiency and scale.

Industry 2.0 The beginning of 20th century marked the start of the second industrial revolution – Industry 2.0. The main contributor to this revolution was the development of machines running on electrical energy. Electrical energy was already being used as a primary source of power. Electrical ma- chines were more efficient to operate and maintain, both in terms of cost and effort unlike the water and steam based machines which were comparatively inefficient and resource hungry. The first assembly line was also built during this era, further streamlining the process of mass production. Mass production of goods using assembly line became a standard practice.

This era also saw the evolution of the industry culture introduced in Industry 1.0 into management program to enhance the efficiency of manufacturing facilities. Various production management techniques such as division of labor, just-in-time manufacturing and lean manufacturing principles refined the underlying processes leading to improved quality and output. American mechanical engineer Fredrick Taylor introduced the study of approached to optimize worker, workplace techniques and optimal allocation of resources.

Industry 3.0 The next industrial revolution resulting in Industry 3.0 was brought about and spurred by the advances in the electronics industry in the last few decades of the 20th century. The invention and manufacturing of a variety electronic devices including transistor and integrated circuits auto- mated the machines substantially which resulted in reduced effort ,increased speed, greater accuracy and even complete replacement of the human agent in some cases. Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), which was first built in 1960s was one of the landmark invention that signified automation using electronics. The integration of electronics hardware into the manufacturing systems also created a requirement of software systems to enable these electronic devices, consequentially fueling the software development market as well. Apart from controlling the hardware, the software systems also enabled many management processes such as enterprise resource planning, inventory management, shipping logistics, product flow scheduling and tracking throughout the factory. The entire industry was further automated using electronics and IT. The automation processes and software systems have continuously evolved with the advances in the electronics and IT industry since then. The pressure to further reduce costs forced many manufacturers to move to low-cost countries. The dispersion of geographical location of manufacturing led to the formation of the concept of Supply Chain Management.

Industry 4.0 The boom in the Internet and telecommunication industry in the 1990’s revolutionized the way we connected and exchanged information. It also resulted in paradigm changes in the manufacturing industry and traditional production operations merging the boundaries of the physical and the virtual world. Cyber Physical Systems (CPSs) have further blurred this boundary resulting in numerous rapid technological disruptions in the industry. CPSs allow the machines to communicate more intelligently with each other with almost no physical or geographical barriers.

The Industry 4.0 using Cyber Physical Systems to share, analyze and guide intelligent actions for various processes in the industry to make the machines smarter. These smart machines can continuously monitor,detect and predict faults to suggest preventive measures and remedial action. This allows better preparedness and lower downtime for industries. The same dynamic approach can be translated to other aspects in the industry such as logistics, production scheduling, optimization of throughput times, quality control, capacity utilization and efficiency boosting. CPPs also allow an industry to be completely virtually visualized, monitored and managed from a remote location and thus adding a new dimension to the manufacturing process. It puts machines,people, processes and infrastructure into a single networked loop making the overall management highly efficient.

As the technology-cost curve becomes steeper everyday, more and more rapid technology disruptions will emerge at even lower costs and revolutionize the industrial ecosystem. Industry 4.0 is still at a nascent stage and the industries are still in the transition state of adoption of the new systems.Industries must adopt the new systems as fast as possible to stay relevant and profitable. Industry 4.0 is here and it is here to stay, at least for the next decade.

Simio Partner Finalist in Franz Edelman Award

The prestigious Franz Edelman Award for Achievement in Operations Research and the Management Sciences was presented at the Edelman Gala on April 16th, 2018 in Baltimore, Maryland. The Franz Edelman competition honors distinction in the practice of Operations Research and Analytics, by both individuals and companies, with emphasis on the beneficial impact of their achievements.

To reach the finals, companies are required to demonstrate how their use of technology is transforming the approach to some of the world’s most complex problems.

Simio is proud to be the provider of the simulation that facilitated one of this year’s finalists, Europcar, through our partner, ACT Operations Research (ACTOR). Our combined technologies have been used to develop Opticar which provides forecasting, simulation and optimization of the processes relating to vehicle rental for the leading European car rental company.

Simulation for Decision Making

The vehicle rental industry is a huge, complex, constantly changing market, with cultural variations across countries. In order to meet dynamic demand, decisions are continuously made regarding fleet assets, their locations, usage and pricing. The combination of AI, statistical modeling and simulation allows all eventualities to be considered and evaluated in order to establish optimum processes and make informed decisions.

Simulation can be used to model the possibilities with respect to both capacity and revenue, helping managers of car rental companies to reduce their risks in terms of planning for optimal fleet saturation. By making quality decisions, they can constantly maximize business opportunity for the company and ensure consistent financial and service performances.

At Simio, we are constantly solving business problems of this kind through simulation. When complex system schedules and decisions are required, we deliver leading edge solutions across many industries, from manufacturing to transportation and logistics.

Simio is proud to congratulate our partner ACTOR, with Europcar, on their outstanding achievement of becoming a Franz Edelman Award finalist.

Optimizing the Smart Factory

In the same way that a product development involves prototyping, the production process for manufacturing that product should also be optimized for maximum efficiency and productivity.Discrete Event Simulation (DES) software approximates the manufacturing process into individual events, so can be used to model each step in manufacturing process for overall performance optimization.

The IT innovations of Industry 4.0 allow data collected from its digitalized component systems in the Smart factory to be used to simulate the whole production line using Discrete Event Simulation software.

Real time information on inventory levels, component histories, transport, logistics and much more can be fed into the model, developing different plans and schedules through simulation. In this way, alternative sources of supply or production deviations can be evaluated against each other while minimizing potential loss and disruption.

When change happens, be it a simple stock out or equipment breakdown or an unexpected natural disaster on a huge scale, Discrete Event Simulation software can produce models showing how downstream services will be affected and the impact on production. Revised courses of action can then be assessed and a solution implemented.

The benefits of using Discrete Event Simulation software to schedule and reduce risk in an Industry 4.0 environment include assuring consistent production where costs are controlled and quality is maintained under any set of circumstances.

Scheduling in the Industry 4.0

Today started badly.

As soon as I hopped into my car, the GPS system was flashing red to show queues of stationary traffic on my regular route to the office. Thankfully, the alternative offered allowed me to arrive on time and keep my scheduled appointments.

In the same way as a GPS combines live traffic data with an accurate map of the city, Simio Software connects real time data sources with a modeled production situation. Just like a GPS, Simio can also impose rules, make decisions, schedule and reschedule.

The major difference is in the scale.

Simio Simulation and Scheduling Software can model entire factories, holding huge quantities of detailed data about each resource, component and material. It leverages big data analysis to run thousands of permutations of scenarios, finding the optimum outcomes for specific circumstances. Lightning fast, it can detect and respond to changes with suggestions that will keep everything flowing in the best possible way.

Thank goodness for Simio, because Industry 4.0 is here.

Smart Factories employ fully integrated and connected equipment and people, each providing real time feedback about their state. Data is constantly collected on each product component, for process monitoring and control. Every aspect of the entire operation is managed through its associated specifications and status data. This large, constant stream of information coming from a known factory configuration can be received, stored, processed and reported upon by the powerful Simio software.

With Industry 4.0, nothing is left to chance. Everything is monitored and optimized, and performance is predicted, measured, improved and adapted on an ongoing basis. Management of so many interconnected components requires a scheduling system that is specifically designed to operate in this dynamic data environment. Simio Production Scheduling Software can be relied upon to provide the integrated solution for enabling technology in the Smart Factories of the future.

We are already seeing a rise in robotics and the increasing digitalization of the manufacturing industry under the effects of Industry 4.0. Soon all components of the factory model will be interconnected, just like my future driverless car that will communicate directly with my GPS to take the best route using current traffic information.

All I will have to do is sit back and enjoy the ride.

Customer Experience

(Guest article by Renee Thiesing)

I recently found myself in a situation that can only be described as completely frustrating. And as an Industrial Engineer, it was even more frustrating because with just a small amount of reorganization and process enhancement, the customer experience could be improved tenfold. No, this aggravating experience did not occur at the Department of Motor Vehicles, it transpired at a children’s ski school drop off counter.

I arrived with my daughter at 8:45am, which is in the middle of the recommended arrival time slot of 8:30-9:00am. The line of about 6 people was making the very small lobby area seem tiny. Besides the fact that the line was moving incredibly slow, when the person at the front of the line arrived at the counter, there was no clear process that occurred. Some people had reservations, some did not. Some people needed to rent equipment, some did not. Depending on your situation, the time that you spent at the counter when you reached the front of the line, varied. It seemed there was no clear benefit to having reservations. And for those poor people who were renting equipment (myself included), after finally reaching the front of the first line, we were sent upstairs to an even more chaotic ski rental area. As we joined the back of another line, I realized that this line was only for boots. Once my daughter was finished getting fitted for boots, I needed to go to the other side of the room for skis. And was the line I waited in for skis the final line? No. Next, we trekked back downstairs to where we started, only to join another line. Here is where we waited for my daughter to finally enter the ski school. After it was all said and done, it was one hour later and the world was left with yet another dissatisfied customer.

I can’t help wonder how some simple changes might improve the system. What if they assigned a certain number of people to arrive at 8:30am, another group to arrive at 8:45am and yet another at 9:00am? Would this arrival process help reduce the time customers wait in line? I believe there should be a clear benefit to people who have reservations. Would their experience be improved if they had a line separate from the people who did not reserve a spot? One of the most annoying aspects of the system was that we had to go upstairs and wait in line to rent our equipment. Non ski school patrons were mixed in with ski school children in this room. At the very least, ski school participants should receive priority for being served. But even better, I would like them to analyze the costs and benefits of moving some equipment rental downstairs to the ski school. I would like to drop my daughter off and let them employees fit her for both her skis and boots right there in the room where she’ll eventually begin her lessons. By having her sizes in my reservation file, they could have the equipment ready in the downstairs area.

This is a very simple system. But since it is broken, perhaps they need a demonstration of how it can be improved. Simulation anyone?

Renee Thiesing
Application Engineer – Simio LLC

Simulation and Strategic Management

Guest article from Marco Ribeiro

Corporations everywhere today face the huge challenge of surviving and growing in an extremely competitive environment. Markets are shaped and reshaped due to constant innovation, customer demands and fierce competition. All these forces demand that corporations continuously reinvent themselves trying to maintain competitive advantages that differentiate them from the competition.

Strategic planning in such an environment is a difficult challenge that corporations must overcome successfully. Corporate strategic planning deals with such complex issues as:

    * Understanding the market and its future trends – understand suppliers, competition, their competitive advantages and market positioning. Know the future trends that will shape the market.
    * Future resource allocation – how the corporation’s resources should be organized in order to maintain an efficient operation.
    * Scope of operations -in which businesses should the corporation operate, which ones should be dropped out
    * Diversification of the corporation’s business – should the corporation focus its operations in a small and related set of businesses or should it look to diversify to heterogeneous businesses
    * Future structure of the company – draw the boundaries of the corporation and determine how these boundaries will affect relationships with suppliers and customers

The strategy defined will address all these issues in detail and determine the future direction of the corporation.

Can we use simulation to support the strategic planning process?
Yes, we can. As Thomas Davenport and Jeanne Harris describe in their book: Competing on Analytics: The new Science of Winning, we will see an increasing demand and use of analytical technologies supporting corporation’s decision-making processes.

Simulation can play an important role by helping managers create models of their markets and processes and “toy” with them in order to get a deeper understanding. We can also use simulation to support such efforts as portfolio analysis and management, helping managers determine how to most effectively manage and configure their product life cycle. We can build models of processes and determine the most efficient configuration. Simulation is a valuable tool to test scenarios and make better business decisions.

Marco Ribeiro
LinkedIn Profile

Industrial Engineers are Happy

I just saw an interesting article written by the Institute of Industrial Engineers (IIE) citing a National Opinion Research Center study at the University of Chicago. According to that study, Industrial Engineering is one of the top ten occupations when rated by job satisfaction and overall happiness. I have long been an IE evangelist, because I feel it is a great career choice, but it never hurts to have some additional evidence.

The study goes on to evaluate compensation for each of those professions and concludes that IE’s are the third highest paid group out of those top ten happiest careers. While I think it is a mistake to choose a career primarily based on financial compensation, it is a nice bonus when a career that makes you happy also pays well.

Here is a short article summarizing the results: Industrial engineering for your mental health?

I’ve always felt that IE was one of the best career choices possible. And I think this is especially true in the field of simulation.

I personally try to visit a few high school classes each year to help students discover our profession and help motivate them to excel in the classes that they need to be successful in engineering. IIE can help you do this.

I urge you to also get involved with your local high schools and help spread the word.

Dave Sturrock
VP Products – Simio LLC

Professional Development

The annual Winter Simulation Conference (WSC) starts two weeks from today. Initially as a practitioner and then later as a vendor I have attended over 20 of these conferences in addition to dozens of other similar events. WSC is just one of many events that you could choose to attend. But why should you attend any of them?

All such events are not identical, but here are a few attributes of WSC that are often found in other events as well:

Basic tutorials – If you are new to simulation, this is a good place to learn the basics from experienced people.

Advanced tutorials – If you already have some experience, these sessions can extend your skills into new areas.

Practitioner papers – There is no better way to find out how simulation can be applied to your applications than to explore a case study in your industry and talk to someone who may have already faced the problems you might face.

Research – Catch up on state-of-the-art research through presentations by faculty and graduate students on what they have recently accomplished.

Networking – The chance to meet with your peers and make contacts is invaluable.

Software exhibits and tutorials – If you have not yet selected a product or you want to explore new options, it is extremely convenient to have many major vendors in one place, many of whom also provide scheduled product tutorials.

Supplemental sessions – Some half and full day sessions are offered before and after the conference to enhance your skill set in a particular area.

Proceedings – A quick way to preview a session, or explore a session that you could not attend. This serves as valuable reference material that you may find yourself reaching for throughout the year.

I think every professional involved in simulation should attend WSC or an equivalent conference at least once early in your career, and then periodically every 2-3 years, perhaps rotating between other similar conferences. If you want to be successful you have to keep your skills and knowledge up to date. And in today’s economy, a strong personal network can be valuable when you least expect it.

I hope to see you at WSC in Miami!

Dave Sturrock
VP Products – Simio LLC

Read My Project Report!

I read a lot, both for business and pleasure. But it seems I never have enough time. So when I sit down with a magazine, for example, most articles probably get less than a couple seconds of attention. Unless an article immediately captures my attention, I quickly move on to the next one. I know that I occasionally miss out on good content, but it is a way to cope with the volume of information that I need to process each day. Consider the implications when you are writing a project report for others to read…

We are all busy. When we are presented with information to read or review, we often don’t have time to wade through the details to see if the content merits our time.

Tell me the most important thing first! Give me the summary! How many times have you asked (or wished) for that?

At one point, it was common to give presentations by starting with an introduction, building the content, and ending with the conclusion – “the big finish”. While this is appropriate for some audiences, many people don’t want to take the time to follow such a presentation. Instead, they want to be presented with a quick overview and a concise summary first. They will then decide to read on if the overview has captured their interest and they need more information.

Think about your own experiences. When you have a document to read and you are not sure it is worth your time, what do you do? If you are like most people you will probably consider most, if not all of the following:
• Does the title look interesting?
• Do you know/respect the author?
• Scan the major headings or callouts for content of interest.
• Scan any pictures/diagrams for content of interest.
• Evaluate the summary or abstract.
While the order and details might differ slightly, at each stage of the above process if you are not convinced of the value of continuing, you will put the document aside. Only after the document has passed this gauntlet of tests, will you spend the time to seriously read the content.

What can we learn from this?

Content is not enough. The best content in the world is of little value unless it is read.

When you are preparing a project report, try to get inside the head of your target audience. If you expect that they will also have a process something like the above, spend adequate time on those parts. Take an extra minute to create an interesting title. Add major headings and callouts to help focus the reader’s attention. Add some figures to help convey and support your message. Have a good abstract and/or summary that is easy to find to help your audience quickly get the point of your report.

Write each report so everyone, including your busy stakeholders, will take the time to read it. Keeping these simple suggestions in mind will help you succeed at getting your message across.

Dave Sturrock
VP Products – Simio LLC

Simulation Applications in Assembly

Assembly processes are a common part of manufacturing and can be found in applications as diverse as apparel, electronics, automotive, aerospace, and even food processing. Assembly operations share many common simulation applications with general manufacturing, but also have many unique characteristics and problems which can often be assisted using simulation.

Material handling and other automated equipment are prevalent in most assembly operations. Simulation can help both in the initial design as well as analyzing to get improved efficiency.

I have found that most people think they can predict process variability fairly well, but when pressed to predict the behavior of even the simplest system, they fail miserably. This is a dangerous combination. Process variability can make the performance of typical systems hard to predict and overconfidence can lead you to incorrect decisions. Fortunately, simulation can provide extensive analysis to project performance, demystify variability, and reduce risk.

Often assemblies are made following a Bill of Material (BOM). Some simulation software has built-in BOM modeling features to make this easy. Whether your supply chain for the assembly involves only other departments in the building or involves off shore companies, simulation can help you assess the supply chain risk and design a system to meet corporate objectives.

For both manual and highly automated systems, line balancing can be a difficult task in assembly. Getting it wrong, even by a small amount, can result in an expensive loss of efficiency. Simulation can help not only tweaking a system for optimal efficiency, but also evaluating major changes in a safe, inexpensive, off-line environment.

Assembly operations can be capital or labor-intensive. Effective allocation of capital and labor is often a need that simulation can fulfill. Simulation can help identify bottlenecks and underutilized resources so that you can gain insight into your operations and get more out of your resources.

Markets change. Technology changes. It sometimes seems like the sole job of Marketing is to make your job miserable by introducing new productivity-damaging products. Simulation can help you respond to change requests with objective data about the cost and other impacts to your system.

It is well known that simulation technology is very effective at creating work schedules while taking into account the complexities of the facility. A few simulation products offer features to enable this application. You can even use the model built for optimizing design as the basis for a plant scheduling model.

In summary, simulation applied to assembly like in other applications, can help streamline designs, reduce risk, improve throughput, and increase your bottom-line profitability.

Dave Sturrock
VP Products – Simio LLC