Keep Simulation Projects Simple Too

We all have stories about company decisions that make us shake our head. If you have ever worked for a large organization, it may have seemed that some of their decisions were, shall we say, sub-optimal.

For example, one particular organization was using a “home grown” time reporting system that was simple, efficient, and worked well. However upper management felt the need to buy a more sophisticated “name brand” system. Unfortunately it was poorly designed and overly complicated. Rollout required extensive training and retraining to learn the simplest tasks. It was so difficult to use that many employees simply stopped using it in favor of informal arrangements with their managers (who also found it difficult to use). As a result, the company spent a lot of money and wasted a lot of employee time, and in the end they had a system that produced inferior results.

If this was an isolated case, it could be easily forgiven. But I expect most people working for large organizations could cite similar situations. Large organizations often tend to replace simplicity with complexity.

Last week in Keep Simulation Simple I talked about KIS; the Keep It Simple concept of doing just enough to do it well and no more!

I discussed how KIS could be applied to model building, but you can also extend the KIS principle to many other aspects of simulation, especially the tools you routinely use.

For time tracking, you can buy expensive highly integrated software systems like the organization above, or for desk- bound employees you can buy software that will sense or periodically ask and record what you are working on. But the cheaper, simpler and more effective solution is simply using a spreadsheet or paper form and having the employee take two minutes at the end of each day and record time against their tasks for that day. Sure there can sometimes be reason for other methods, but for the majority of us the spread sheet solution is superior.

For project management, choose the simplest tool that will meet your needs. Some projects are complex enough that they need project management software like Microsoft Project or something even better. But in many cases, such software results in a waste of time when a simple spreadsheet could meet your needs. In my experience project management software is often overkill for the types of projects we usually encounter.

In simulation software there is some inclination to buy the most comprehensive software that you can afford. But it is often better just to buy the simplest software that is likely to meet your short to intermediate-term needs. An important caution here – make sure that your software has an adequate upgrade path so that as your needs evolve you can migrate into more feature-rich software without losing your initial investment in software, training, and models.

Stay vigilant for time wasters – they often come disguised as “cool technology” and “time savers”.
Keep It Simple.

Dave Sturrock
VP Products – Simio LLC

Keep Simulation Simple

I mentioned a while back that I am a Boy Scout. OK, maybe my boyhood days are long gone, but I still consider myself to be a Scout. I learned many lessons as a Scout; lessons that continue to serve me well today. One of those is KIS or Keep It Simple.

I remember learning primitive camping skills. Many novice campers would bring too much gear, requiring hauling and storing it, and just in general complicating camp life. The simple (KIS) approach is to bring only what you absolutely need. Many novice campers would also select poor camp sites and then spend time dealing with dampness, bugs, discomfort, safety issues and more. The simple approach is to avoid those issues by selecting a good camp site. Then in both cases, you spend all that saved time enjoying the camp and doing what you came to do. KIS pays off.

KIS applies equally well to many aspects of simulation. When things go wrong, it can often be traced back to too much complexity.

  • How many people are subjected to overly complex management procedures?
  • Are the procedures used for planning and tracking your work making the most effective use of everyone’s time?
  • Is every aspect of your work done effectively?
  • The basic concept of KIS is to do just enough to do it well and no more! Does this mean you should not do your best? No. But it does mean that you should segment your work into small phases and KIS on each phase.

    In model-building for example, let’s say a stakeholder expresses desire for a detailed model for the 10 areas of his system. One common approach is to go off and create exactly what the stakeholder asked for. Unfortunately, this will probably be wrong. A better approach is to pick one representative area, and do a very high-level model of that one area. Then review that model and results with the stakeholder. In most cases, you will both learn a lot and you may jointly decide on a different approach. Then perhaps do a detailed model of that same area or perhaps extend that high-level model to a few more areas. Again you will probably learn something that will change your approach or objectives. For each phase, you want to do the simplest thing (KIS) that will meet the objectives for that phase. In this way, you will minimize any wasted effort and come much more quickly to exactly what the stakeholder needs.

    Let’s consider model-building at a much more detailed level. A common mistake by novices is to build a large section of a model (perhaps even an entire system) all at once. And then you hit “Go” and it does not work. Why doesn’t it work? There are perhaps a thousand possible reasons to investigate. Even worse, there are most likely dozens of small or large problems, each potentially obscuring the others. Verifying and validating such a model is a daunting task. A much better approach is to start by selecting a very small (KIS) portion of the model to build and verify that it works. Then repeat. When a problem is discovered in any new section, it is generally easy to find it because you know it is a result of that latest section just added. Again, “Keep It Simple”.

    Remember, Keep It Simple. Work effectively and exceed your stakeholder expectations one simple step at a time.

    Dave Sturrock
    VP Products – Simio LLC