Simulationist Bill of Rights

In the Simulation Stakeholder Bill of Rights I proposed some reasonable expectations that a consumer of a simulation project might have. But this is not a one-way street. The modeler or simulationist should have some reasonable expectations as well.

1. Clear objectives – A simulationist can help stakeholders discover and refine their objectives, but clearly the stakeholders must agree on project objectives. The primary objectives must remain solid throughout the project.
2. Stakeholder Participation – Adequate access and cooperation must be provided by the people who know the system both in the early phases and throughout the project. Stakeholders will need to be involved periodically to assess progress and resolve outstanding issues.
3. Timely Data – The functional specification should describe what data will be required, when it will be delivered and by whom. Late, missing, or poor quality data can have a dramatic impact on a project.
4. Management Support – The simulationist’s manager should support the project as needed not only in issues like tools and training discussed below, but also in shielding the simulationist from energy sapping politics and bureaucracy.
5. Cost of Agility – If stakeholders ask for project changes, they should be flexible in other aspects such as delivery date, level of detail, scope, or project cost.
6. Timely Review/Feedback – Interim updates should be reviewed promptly and thoughtfully by the appropriate people so that meaningful feedback can be provided and any necessary course corrections can be immediately made.
7. Reasonable Expectations – Stakeholders must recognize the limitations of the technology and project constraints and not have unrealistic expectations. A project based on the assumption of long work hours is a project that has been poorly managed.
8. “Don’t shoot the messenger” – The modeler should not be criticized if the results promote an unexpected or undesirable conclusion.
9. Proper Tools – A simulationist should be provided the right hardware and software appropriate to the project. While “the best and latest” is not always required, a simulationist should not have to waste time on outdated or inappropriate software and inefficient hardware.
10. Training and Support – A simulationist should not be expected to “plunge ahead” into unfamiliar software and applications without training. Proper training and support should be provided.
11. Integrity – A simulationist should be free from coercion. If a stakeholder “knows” the right answer before the project starts, then there is no point to starting the project. If not, then the objectivity of the analysis should be respected with no coercion to change the model to produce the desired results.
12. Respect – A good simulationist may sometimes make the job look easy, but don’t take them for granted. A project often “looks” easy only because the simulationist did everything right, a feat that in itself is very difficult. And sometimes a project looks easy only because others have not seen the nights and weekends involved.

Discussing these expectations ahead of time can enhance communications and help ensure that the project is successful – a win-win situation that meets everyone’s needs.

Dave Sturrock
VP Products – Simio LLC

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