Simulation in Agriculture

Guest article from Sophie Scotts

Over the past several months you have touched on many fields that simulation would benefit such as healthcare and disaster management. I would like now to recall something you said in your “Simulation Expertise through Tours” blog from September, “Don’t limit yourself to just your area of interest/expertise. Often you can learn even more from tours outside your comfort zone.” I think for many professionals in the simulation industry, applying simulation to the field of agriculture might be out of your expertise or comfort zone, but don’t let this stop you.

Since I work for the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) I see first hand how beneficial simulation could be to our American farmers. Nowadays farmers must be laborers and savvy business men in order to survive in our current economy. It isn’t just milking old Bessie in the barn anymore; they must consider how each area on the farm affects the bottom line, just like any business. Farmers must look at the efficiency of their livestock and harvesting processes and the possibility of diversification in order to stay in business, and simulation could help in each of these areas.

Any farm that has livestock has 3 main questions they must ask themselves; How do I efficiently get livestock onto my farm? How do I efficiently get food to my livestock? And how do I efficiently use (or dispose of) the waste? If they are a dairy they must also consider the most efficient method to milk the cows. For instance, a poultry facility will house several thousands chickens a year for a few months each. During each cycle the chicks are trucked in, food is trucked in (or harvested from the fields), chickens are provided a specified amount of food and space, then they are trucked out (full grown), and wastes are trucked out so the nutrients can be utilized elsewhere. This process could benefit from simulation to create the most efficient scenario.

It is very common now for farmers to turn to non-traditional methods of bringing income onto the farm. One of these methods is to direct market their goods to the public through farmers markets, community supported agriculture (CSA), or opening stores on-property. They must ask themselves; How do I efficiently transport my products to the farmers market? How do I efficiently package and deliver my products to my customers? Or how do I handle parking and lines in my store? Simulation in each of these processes would allow the farmer to make an informed decision on the best management of his business.

So you can see that simulation can have a place in even the most unlikely fields (literally). American farms are a business and thus need to consider the efficiency of processes they undertake in order to meet the bottom line, and simulation can help. So don’t be afraid to think outside of the box and your area of expertise.

Sophie Scotts
United States Department of Agriculture

Help Wanted

Yes, it looks like hard economic times may be coming. But no, this has nothing to do with that.

This blog is a community service. To continue to be effective, we need community participation. That means you.

There are many ways you can participate.

1) Comment – At the end of each article is a link. Click it and add to the discussion. Agree. Disagree. Add new information or a different viewpoint. All civil discussion is welcome.
2) Suggest Topics – Contact me with any ideas you have about future content or ideas for making the blog more useful.
3) Write an Article – It doesn’t have to be rocket science. Nor does it have to be long or formal. Everyone has something to share. The main rule is to keep it unbiased and non-commercial. I am happy to edit it if you like and even publish it under a pen name if you are publicity shy (although I strongly prefer using your real name).
4) Become a Guest Author – I would like nothing better than to “share the limelight” with others. You can write one article or regular articles. Choose your own topics and frequency.

It’s all about sharing to help the simulation community. This is a simple way to give back. Anyone can do it. For any of the above or other ideas, you can contact me using dsturrock at Simio dot biz (name slightly obscured to slow down spammers).

Thanks for your help.

Dave Sturrock
VP Products – Simio LLC

Simulation in Healthcare

Over the years, I have had several occasions to use medical facilities for myself and my family. Some visits were routine, such as for a diagnostic tests or images. Others were for much more critical visits to an emergency department. As my visits spanned many facilities and many time periods, I observed a dramatic difference in the service provided. In the case of bad service I just had to wonder “Didn’t anyone ever study this operation? Did anyone ever simulate it?”

Simulation can bring significant benefits to healthcare, just as it does in other types of systems. Some of those benefits come from the simulation’s ability to:
• Account for variability in human behavior
• Account for variability in demand
• Capture complexities and interdependencies
• Capture system performance over a period of time
• Support continuous process improvement and evaluation of new scenarios
• Provide an objective basis for evaluating policies and strategies

Here are a few possible applications to illustrate how simulation is often used in the healthcare industry:

New Facility Design – Evaluate design to assure that present and future objectives will be met. Reduce capital costs by “running” the facility under various scenarios and identifying excess capacity . Reduce operating costs by supporting lean and six sigma analyses. Increase throughput through process flow optimization and identification of bottlenecks and capacity constraints.

Emergency Department (ED) – Decrease LOS (Length of Stay) and LWBS (Leave Without Being Seen) yielding higher patient satisfaction. Improve staff efficiency and improve room and resource utilization resulting in lower costs.

Outpatient Lab and Surgery – Determine optimal staff and resource allocation. Balance scheduled demand with the often-critical unscheduled demand. Decrease lab and diagnostic turn-around time. Identify non-value-added and redundant processes.

Ambulance Service – Evaluate operational scenarios for both road and air-based vehicles. Evaluate new technology to determine their effect on the entire system. Pre-plan dynamic utilization-based response guidelines to optimize performance during major ED demand periods.

Vaccine Distribution – Evaluate regional material stocking strategies, distribution strategies, and staffing.

Often the benefits from these studies are reported in the millions of dollars so they are well worth the undertaking.

One source of additional information is the Society for Simulation in Healthcare which is having their annual conference in January. Another source is the Society for Health Systems which offers the latest in process analytics, tools, techniques and methodologies for performance improvement.

Dave Sturrock
VP Products – Simio LLC